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Friday, May 23, 2014

Watching the Brazil World Cup at a distance

It’s hard to imagine any destination in the world being quite so exciting as Brazil next month. The World Cup beckons and thousands of football fans from around the world will be making their way there soon.

It’s estimated that about 10,000 England football fans will be there, about half of them with tickets for the opening group games. While other nations may not have quite so many fans travelling to see their matches, it gives some indication of the influx of football tourists Brazil will see during the tournament. The promise is that this will be a World Cup with a party atmosphere and there are few nations who are so completely wrapped up in football as Brazil.

But anyone who’s not a big football fan would be sensible to have postpone any travel plans for Brazil until the World Cup has been and gone, because prices on everything from food and drinks to accommodation will rocket during the World Cup.

It’s also not going to be the easiest of places for the footie fans to move around to watch the various matches. With 12 different cities hosting the different games, there’s going to be a lot of travelling for fans to do within the country. Many of the venues are at least a two-day drive from the others, most notably the rainforest city of Manaus, where England has its first match against Italy at the Arena Amazonia on 14 June.

Added to the distances that fans will be travelling there are other potential hazards to overcome. Sensible travellers will have already been immunised against yellow fever and be taking anti-malarial medication, but there’s also a risk of contracting dengue fever while in Brazil. This is a disease carried by mosquitoes and symptoms include muscular aches, headaches and fever. Unfortunately there is no vaccination for dengue fever; the best protection is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. Three of the 12 World Cup venues are currently carrying a high alert for dengue fever.

All in all, unless you are absolutely passionate about the beautiful game, you’re probably far better off staying home and watching the World Cup on TV. The host nation is also tipped to win the tournament and most bookmakers are offering odds of about 3/1 for Brazil to win. Keep up to date on how the different nations’ chances are rated throughout the tournament at http://www.bet365.com/news/en/betting. There are plenty of other bets to choose from, of course. For example, you could back the player you think will win the Golden Boot, or the one you think you will score the most goals during the tournament. And then there’s live in-play betting which always makes watching the games that little bit more exciting.

While a part of you may wish you were going to see the World Cup in person, it certainly won’t be the most relaxing of trips for those fans who are going, and one thing that’s always guaranteed when watching the games on TV is a great view of the action.

Arena Amazonia in Manaus
Arena Amazonia in Manaus

Houses on the outskirts of Manaus , Brazil
Houses on the outskirts of Manaus , Brazil

The Opera in Manaus, Brazil
The Opera in Manaus, Brazil

Manaus city centre, Brazil
Manaus city centre, Brazil